THE CURRENT LANDSCAPE

The Reality of Healthcare Security

The rising incidence of patient-generated violence has changed the healthcare environment dramatically. Hospital pharmacies need to manage inventory, remain compliant, and prevent the costly theft of controlled narcotic medications.      


Efforts to circumvent user name and password protections are endemic in healthcare environments. Providers carry the responsibility of keeping their patients, residents, staff, data and facilities safe 24/7.

It’s a Balancing Act

Decisions to safeguard patients and visitors while separating public spaces from restricted ones. Hospital and healthcare systems have a duty to secure patient information, medications and valuable equipment. 


The need to use multiple user names and ID’s Maintaining access integrity reduces facility liability.

What’s the Real Cost?

‘Do more with less’ budgets remain a concern. Innovation and automation continue to suffer. Multimillion dollar fines for non-compliance Hospital security dept. reputations are being tested daily with maintaining the public safety at ‘any cost’.


Password management is another hidden cost that is exasperated by HIPPA regulations that require users to change their passwords periodically.

BUILD THE RIGHT SOLUTION

Visitor Management, Intrusion Detection, Loss Prevention, Pharmaceutical Inventory and more

Hospital staff typically need to access multiple computers throughout the day. Forgetting to log off from a computer or their personal tablet can compromise patient data.  


The MBX-HC sends the Staffer’s credentials over a secure Bluetooth link, enabling one touch logon.  When the Staffer walks away, or worse forgets their tablet, the MBX-17 automatically logs the system off protecting data and meeting security requirements.  


The system can be configured to work with multiple applications enabling one touch log on to patient records, administrative files and research resources.





                 Biometric Associates, LP  | 1101 E. 33rd St | E303 | Baltimore | MD 21218